About Us  |  About Cheetah®  |  Contact Us

News

Subscribe to the Employment Law Daily RSS Subscribe

Restaurant settlement with DOL didn’t bar suit by workers who didn’t sign WH-60 form

July 18th, 2017

By Lorene D. Park, J.D.
Despite the Department of Labor’s reassurance to a restaurant employer that it had the authority to settle minimum wage and overtime claims on behalf of 19 employees, a subset of those employees (and one additional plaintiff) was not precluded from subsequently filing suit under the FLSA, ruled a federal district court [Read more...]


Demeanor and communication style, not age, were why supervisor was fired

July 17th, 2017

By Kathleen Kapusta, J.D.
Citing numerous performance reviews documenting issues with an employee’s demeanor and communication style, a written warning for his “argumentative and insubordinate” discussions with his supervisor, his placement on a performance improvement plan due to his “repeated inappropriate feedback,” and a string of complaints against him, the Seventh Circuit found it clear that [Read more...]


Five years after EEOC charge, deviation from usual rehiring process suggests retaliation

July 17th, 2017

By Lorene D. Park, J.D.
Reversing summary judgment on a former Walgreen employee’s retaliation claim, the Seventh Circuit held that, despite the fact that years had passed since she filed EEOC charges of race discrimination, the plaintiff offered sufficient circumstantial evidence of a causal link to support her Section 1981 and Title VII retaliation claims. This [Read more...]


Jury instructions need not detail employer’s post-termination ADA duties, possible accommodations

July 17th, 2017

By Kathleen Kapusta, J.D.
A district court’s decision not to specifically instruct a jury in an ADA discrimination lawsuit that a municipal employer had a continuing duty to engage in an interactive process with its employee and to use information it learned after his termination to reasonably accommodate his sleep apnea was not an abuse of [Read more...]


Wisconsin right-to-work law’s ban on union security agreements upheld

July 17th, 2017

By Ronald Miller, J.D.
A union’s challenge to a provision in Wisconsin “Right-to-Work” law, Act 1, which prohibits union-security agreements that require employees to pay any dues, fees, or assessments to a labor organization, fell based on the Seventh Circuit’s ruling in Sweeney v. Pence . Here, the appeals court found that its decision in Sweeney [Read more...]