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Creative forces behind fictional crime fighters—and the EEOC—are on the case in advancing equality for women in Hollywood

June 21st, 2017  |  Cynthia L. Hackerott

The impressive box-office performance of the new Wonder Woman movie, the recent success of two female stars of a long-running network television series in negotiating pay increases on par with their male counterparts, and reports earlier this year that the EEOC is in settlement talks with the major studios to resolve charges that they systemically discriminated against female directors are promising signs that equal opportunity and pay equity for women in Hollywood is progressing. However, getting a “Hollywood ending” as to gender equity remains a struggle.

Success illustrates value of wonder women. In two recent developments of note, women who have brought beloved fictional female crime fighters to movie and television screens have triumphed. First, Forbes reported just yesterday that the new Wonder Woman film has earned around $582-$585 million worldwide as of Monday, and is expected to cross the $600 million-plus global milestone on Thursday. Wonder Woman is the first superhero film that has both a woman, Gal Gadot, in the title role, and a woman, Patty Jenkins*, as its sole director. According to the Forbes article, the film is well on its way to becoming the biggest-grossing live-action movie ever from a female director, and it looks like the film will be the largest grossing movie ever helmed by a solo female director. A June 14 piece in Variety discusses how the critical and commercial success of the film could pave the way for more female directors. Indeed, Variety was the first to report (in an exclusive story) yesterday that Jenkins is already at work in developing a sequel.

Second, earlier this month, various media outlets, including Variety and Deadline, reported that long-time “Criminal Minds” stars Kirsten Vangsness and A.J. Cook closed deals to return to the 13th season of the CBS series (a personal favorite of mine) after the women negotiated together  seeking parity with their male co-stars, Joe Mantegna and Matthew Gray Gubler, who both closed their contracts in May. The reports indicate that the two actresses have landed raises that put them essentially on par with Gubler. According to the Deadline story, the female stars took a similar stand during their 2013 negotiations, with less success. The two woman had consistently been paid less than half of what their male counterparts, Gubler and Shemar Moore, were making at the time, Deadline noted, reporting that while they eventually secured salary increases, they did not achieve parity at that time.

On June 14, Vangsness tweeted that she was correctly quoted in the Variety article as to the following statement she made last month when asked by TMZ if she would not return to the popular show if she was unsuccessful in her pay parity efforts:

“’That’s the way it works sadly,’ she said. ’I feel so uncomfortable about it and I feel so sad. You know what it would be telling me? That my value isn’t what I thought it was and in that case, I need to go get another job.’ Speaking of Mantegna and Gubler, she continued, ‘There is the rationale that they’re a little more popular or they’ve paid their dues a little more — that’s absolutely true and that’s why I’m not asking to be paid the same amount as them. I’m asking to be paid closer. Just closer.’”

EEOC reportedly in settlement talks. This past February, Deadline reported that an EEOC investigation, started in 2015, into allegations of discrimination against female directors in the film and television industries “is over” and the agency “has moved into the settlement phase.” Deadline quotes “a knowledgeable source” as saying “‘[e]very one of the major studios has received a charge contending that they failed to hire women directors.” If the agency is unsuccessful in resolving the charges, it may file a lawsuit, Deadline’s source said (noting the EEOC’s standard process).

In October 2015, the EEOC began contacting female directors to investigate gender discrimination in Hollywood, according to a contemporaneous report in the Los Angeles Times. Deadline published a similar report at that time. An updated story posted by the LA Times on May 11, 2016, reports that the EEOC interviewed more than 50 women directors during the fall and winter of 2015, and the federal agency was “widening its circle of interview subjects to include studio executives, producers, agents, actors and male directors.”

Also on May 11, 2016, the ACLU issued a statement reporting that the EEOC and the OFCCP were investigating allegations of discrimination against women directors in the film and television industries. In that statement, Melissa Goodman, director of the LGBTQ, Gender and Reproductive Justice Project at the ACLU of Southern California said that the investigation was launched following the group’s 2015 efforts in which it sent letters to the EEOC, the OFCCP, and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing asking these government agencies “to investigate the systemic failure to hire women directors at all levels of the film and television industry.” Among other statistical evidence, the letters cited a 2015 USC study which found that only 1.9 percent of directors of the top-grossing 100 films of 2013 and 2014 were women, and that, of the 1,300 top-grossing films from 2002-2014, only 4.1 percent of all directors were women. Wide disparities also exist as to women in directing episodic television, the letters claimed.

The failure to hire women directors in film and television cannot be attributed to a lack of qualified or interested women, the ACLU asserted, stating that estimates place the number of female students in prominent film schools such as USC, NYU and UCLA who are focusing on directing as roughly equal to the number of men.

In a statement commenting on the February 2017 report in Deadline, the ACLU noted that, while it could not independently confirm the information in the Deadline piece because federal law prohibits government agencies from commenting on specific ongoing investigations, it had “no reason to doubt its veracity.” Moreover, the ALCU believes that the story was bolstered by another Deadline article earlier that month concerning December 2016 contract negotiations between the major studios and networks and the Directors Guild of America during which the guild pressed producers to adopt a rule “’that would have required producers to interview female and minority candidates as part of the hiring process for directing jobs.’” According to Deadline, the companies, “declined to discuss the proposal ‘for legal reasons’” that involved their settlement talks with the EEOC.

Despite the recent successes of prominent female directors, the vast majority of women directors are still denied equal opportunity, the ACLU maintains in its February 2017 statement, citing another USC study published that same month which showed that “the percentage of women directing movies in 2016 fell by nearly 50 percent from the 2015 number, all the way down to the same percentage as in 2007.”

“And even if a female director does get hired,” the ACLU statement continues, “research shows she’s much less likely than a male director to get hired again.”

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* I cannot resist pointing out that, like me, Jenkins grew up primarily in Lawrence, KS, and attended my alma mater, Lawrence High School, through her junior year.

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