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U.S. signs international treaty promoting worldwide rights of persons with disabilities

August 21st, 2009  |  Deborah Hammonds

>The Obama administration continued to act on its stated commitment to be a “strong advocate for persons with disabilities” when it signed the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The convention is a treaty committing governments to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and basic freedoms by people with disabilities worldwide.

When Susan Rice, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, signed the treaty, she noted it was “the first new human rights convention of the 21st century adopted by the United Nations and further advances the human rights of the 650 million people with disabilities worldwide. It urges equal protection and equal benefits under the law for all citizens, it rejects discrimination in all its forms, and calls for the full participation and inclusion in society of all persons with disabilities.”

“We all still have a great deal more to do at home and abroad,” she continued. “As President Obama has noted, people with disabilities far too often lack the choice to live in communities of their own choosing; their unemployment rate is much higher than those without disabilities; they are much more likely to live in poverty; health care is out of reach for far too many; and too many children with disabilities are denied a world-class education around the world. Discrimination against people with disabilities is not simply unjust; it hinders economic development, limits democracy, and erodes societies.”

Senior presidential advisor Valerie Jarrett took a moment during the signing ceremony to announce the President’s intent to create a new senior-level diplomatic post in the State Department to promote the rights of people with disabilities internationally.

“This individual will be charged with developing a comprehensive strategy to promote the rights of persons with disabilities internationally; he or she will coordinate a process for the ratification of the Convention in conjunction with the other federal offices; last but not least, this leader will serve as a symbol of public diplomacy on disability issues, and work to ensure that the needs of persons with disabilities are addressed in international situations. By appointing the necessary personnel to lead and ensure compliance on disability human rights issues, the President reinforces his commitment to the UN Convention.”

The United States joined 141 other countries that have signed the U.N. treaty. President Obama must submit the treaty to the U.S. Senate for ratification.